Lunar occultation of omega-1 Sco (2012 Aug 24)

posted: 1818 days ago, on Sunday, 2012 Aug 26 at 09:14
tags: astronomy, astrophotography, Moon, Ed Foster, Kos Coronaios.

The Moon occulted 4th magnitude omega-1 Scorpii early-evening on the 24th. Cape Town had last-minute cloud, but Limpopo was clear and had Kos Coronaios on stand-by.

Lunar views by Kos Coronaios (Limpopo)

Lunar views by Kos Coronaios (Limpopo)

Lunar views by Ed Foster (Cape Town)

First-Quarter Moon, showing the heavily cratered southern (top) regions and the relatively smooth northern and eastern extents. Near the left edge lies Mare Crisium (Sea of Crises) a 640km diameter lava-filled basin. Slightly larger (670km) but not suffering from foreshortening is Mare Serenitatis, the Sea of Serenity, just east of the terminator in the lower portion of the image. The prominent crater on the terminator, almost in the centre of the image, is Albategnius, a circular formation 140km across named for the 9th century Arabian astronomer Muhammad ibn al-Battani. Next to it (lower left) is the more faded Hipparchus, 155km across, named for the Greek astronomer, and most famous for being the landing site of Tintin's moon rocket.

Lunar views by Ed Foster (Cape Town)

The largest crater lying on the terminator in the image above, near the bottom-middle, is known as Walter. It is a massive (145-km across) walled plain that is amongst the older formations on the Moon, having formed some 4 billion years ago (during the Nectarian period). This exceptional formation is best seen at First Quarter (as in the image above) or six days after Full Moon, and is a prominent feature even in binoculars. It was named in honour of Bernhard Walther, 15th century Bavarian astronomer who was the leading light of his time. A careful observer, his meticulous observations were later used by Copernicus, Kepler and Brahe to test their theories - the first demonstration of the value of an extended series of observations. Walther safe-guarded the observations of his mentor, Regiomontanus (Johann Muller), and used the latter's brass observing equipment in his modified home in Nuremberg, after his passing. The innovative use of a geared clock for timing observatiosn of astronomical events was pioneerd by Walther, as was the practice of recording sky conditions and estimates of the reliability of an observation, setting the precedent for future astronomical practice.

nothing more to see. please move along.